<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 5.5.2653.12">
<TITLE>RE: [Techtalk] Java on Linux</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>&nbsp;</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>The last time I worked with java on FreeBSD it worked fine except for threads. That was a year ago, things might have changed in the meantime. Right now I use Sun's JDK on linux. If you download the tar file and do a make install;make, that should do it. The instructions for setting up your CLASSPATH is in the docs.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>--Tricia</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>-----Original Message-----</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>From: Aaron Mulder</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>To: techtalk@linuxchix.org</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Sent: 1/10/02 9:56 AM</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Subject: [Techtalk] Java on Linux</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>Well, I can't speak for FreeBSD, but I do Java development on</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Linux for work, so I can at least help get up and running there.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>(According to Google, a FreeBSD JDK is available via &quot;ports&quot;, and a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>native</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>JDK may be included in the forthcoming FreeBSD 4.5)</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>First, there's a 3-tier Java process on Linux.&nbsp; Sun has a JDK,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>which they have adapted for Linux.&nbsp; Then Blackdown (blackdown.org)</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>tweaks</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Sun's release to work a little better on Linux (and support more CPU</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>types</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>than x86), and then Caldera tweaks Blackdown's release to work a little</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>better on their distro.</FONT>
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>As well, IBM has released a JDK for Linux, which is</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>well-regarded.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>I think it may be based on the Sun source code, but it has diverged </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>greatly, including using a non-HotSpot VM.</FONT>
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>If you're new to Java on Linux, I'd try Blackdown's JDK first.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>In the Sun or Blackdown case, you're probably safest going with 1.3.1</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>for</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>now -- IBM just calls theirs &quot;1.3&quot;, though they're up to &quot;Service</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Release </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>10&quot; now.</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>Whichever you pick, you should download a .tar.gz package</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>instead</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>of an RPM -- this ensures that everything will be installed under one</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>directory, and you can more conveniently pick that directory.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Personally, I use /usr/local/java as the root of all my Java</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>installations, but it matters little.&nbsp; So go to your favorite directory </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>and tar -xzf and you should get &quot;jdk1.3.1/&quot; or &quot;j2sdk1.3.1/&quot; or </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&quot;IBMJava2-13/&quot; or whatever.</FONT>
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>To see whether it works, go to the JDK directory and run</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&quot;bin/java -version&quot;.&nbsp; You should get something like:</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>java version &quot;1.3.1&quot;</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Java(TM) 2 Runtime Environment, Standard Edition (build</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Blackdown-1.3.1-FCS)</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build Blackdown-1.3.1-FCS, mixed mode)</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>If it craps out, let me know the error message.&nbsp; With the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>original </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>1.3.0 series, there was a problem using certain Linux kernels that could</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>be resolved by adding some env variable in the Java startup script to </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>claim you were running 2.2.5 -- we can look that up.</FONT>
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>If you get a bunch of font not found messages when you run a GUI</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>application, there's an updated &quot;jre/lib/font.properties&quot; that Sun links</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>to in their release notes for 1.3.1.&nbsp; This has been a problem on Red Hat</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>7.x for me, but it's easy to fix.</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>Anyway, if &quot;java -version&quot; runs successfully, then you can</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>either </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>add &lt;jdk&gt;/bin to the system path (in /etc/profile) or create a little </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>script to set the path and JAVA_HOME for your current shell.&nbsp; I prefer</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>the </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>latter on a development box, since it's easier to swap between JDKs, but</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>otherwise there's no reason not to set it for the whole system.</FONT>
</P>

<P>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <FONT SIZE=2>Beyond the JDK, I use JBuilder 4/5 for development, as well as a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>boatload of open-source projects, and I can help get those configured</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>too.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Aaron</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2><A HREF="ftp://metalab.unc.edu/pub/linux/devel/lang/java/blackdown.org/JDK-1.3.1/" TARGET="_blank">ftp://metalab.unc.edu/pub/linux/devel/lang/java/blackdown.org/JDK-1.3.1/</A></FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>i386/FCS/j2sdk-1.3.1-FCS-linux-i386.tar.bz2</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2><A HREF="http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/download-linux.html" TARGET="_blank">http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/download-linux.html</A></FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2><A HREF="http://www6.software.ibm.com/dl/dklx130/dklx130-d?S_PKG=devkit&S_CMP=&S_" TARGET="_blank">http://www6.software.ibm.com/dl/dklx130/dklx130-d?S_PKG=devkit&S_CMP=&S_</A></FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>TACT=</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>On Thu, 10 Jan 2002, Amanda Babcock wrote:</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; &gt; I'd be interested in that, especially from a Linux perspective.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; &gt; I've written some applets, and periodically think about updating</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; &gt; my Java knowledge to get more fluent in new stuff like J2EE/Swing,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; &gt; but I keep hitting problems getting downloaded JDKs to work at all,</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; &gt; and all the Java folks I know are Windows users.&nbsp; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; Ooh, yeah!&nbsp; I've tried to learn Java before only to find that I</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>couldn't</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; figure out the basic &quot;install what where, invoke it how&quot; questions and</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; quit in frustration.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; </FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; Of course, there's the fact that I'm actually on FreeBSD, not Linux...</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>&gt; which means a certain amount of translating in the &quot;where&quot; department</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>:)</FONT>
</P>
<BR>
<BR>

<P><FONT SIZE=2>_______________________________________________</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Techtalk mailing list</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2>Techtalk@linuxchix.org</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2><A HREF="http://www.linuxchix.org/mailman/listinfo/techtalk" TARGET="_blank">http://www.linuxchix.org/mailman/listinfo/techtalk</A></FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>